Mount Kilimanjaro Climbing

Mount Kilimanjaro Climbing

Mount Kilimanjaro three volcanic cones, “Kibo”, “Mawenzi”, and “Shira”, is a dormant volcano in Tanzania. It is the highest mountain in Africa, about 4,900 metres (16,100 ft) from its base, and 5,895 metres (19,341 ft) above sea level

Kilimanjaro is a large stratovolcano and is composed of three distinct volcanic cones: Kibo, the highest; Mawenzi at 5,149 metres (16,893 ft) and Shira, the shortest at 4,005 metres (13,140 ft). Mawenzi and Shira are extinct, while Kibo is dormant .Uhuru Peak is the highest summit on Kibo’s crater rim

To reach the summit, one must pass through five distinct climate zones ranging from rainforest to alpine desert and eventually glacial Arctic. Although it is possible to climb Mount Kilimanjaro without any specific mountaineering training or equipment, summiting the Roof of Africa is not an easy task.

There are seven main routes up Kilimanjaro. Each one varies in terms of difficulty, traffic, and scenic beauty, and choosing the right one for you is a key part of the planning process. Timings depend on which route you choose, with hikes taking anywhere from five to 10 days. The routes with the highest success rate are those that take longer and ascend at a gradual rate, allowing climbers to acclimatize to the change in altitude. Marangu is traditionally considered the easiest route but Rongai, Lemosho, and Northern Circuit have the highest success rates.

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